Coastal and low-lying escape routes flood 2-4 hours before arrival of the hurricane center.

Small craft in unprotected anchorages break moorings.

Category Three Hurricane Winds 111-130 mph (96-113 kt or 178-209 km/hr).

Storm surge is generally 9-12 ft above normal.

Some structural damage to small residences and utility buildings with a minor amount of curtain wall failures. Damage to shrubbery and trees with foliage blown off trees and large tress blown down. Mobile homes and poorly constructed signs are destroyed.

Low-lying escape routes are cut by rising water 3-5 hours before arrival of the hurricane center.

Flooding near the coast destroys smaller structures with larger structures damaged by battering of floating debris. Terrain continuously lower than 5 ft above mean sea level may be flooded inland 8 miles (13 km) or more.

Evacuation of low-lying residences within several blocks of the shoreline may be required.

Category Four Hurricane Winds 131-155 mph (114-135 kt or 210-249 km/hr).

Storm surge is generally 13-18 ft above normal.

More extensive curtainwall failures with some complete roof structure failures on small residences. Shrubs, trees, and all signs are blown down. Complete destruction of mobile homes. Extensive damage to doors and windows.

Low-lying escape routes may be cut off by rising water 3-5 hours before arrival of the hurricane center.

Major damage to lower floors of structures near the shore. Terrain lower than 10 ft above sea level may flood, requiring massive evacuation of residential areas as far inland as 6 miles (10 km).

Category Five Hurricane Winds greater than 155 mph (135 kt or 249 km/hr).

Storm surge is generally greater than 18 ft above normal.

Complete roof failure on many residences and industrial buildings. Some complete building failures with small utility buildings blown over or away. All shrubs, trees, and signs blown down. Complete destruction of mobile homes. Severe and extensive window and door damage.

Low-lying escape routes cut by rising water 3-5 hours before arrival of the hurricane center.

Major damage to lower floors of all structures located less than 15 ft above sea level and within 500 yards of the shoreline.

Massive evacuation of residential areas on low ground within 5-10 miles (8-16 km) of the shoreline may be required.

Names: Once a storm system with counter-clockwise circulation and wind speeds of 39 mph or greater is identified by the Tropical Prediction Center near Miami, a name from the list is assigned to the storm

There are 11 regional lists of names, Atlantic, Eastern North Pacific, Central North Pacific, Western North Pacific, Western Australian Region, Northern Australian Region, Eastern Australian Region, Fiji Region, Papua New Guinea Region, Philippine Region and Southwest Indian Ocean.

Using women's names became the practice during World War II, following the use of a woman's name for a storm in the 1941 novel "Storm" by George R. Stewart.

In 1979, the list of hurricane names for the Atlantic regions began to include male names.

Six separate name lists are developed and agreed upon by the World Meteorological Organization.

The lists are rotated every six years.