EASTERN CAROLINA -

United States officials are deciding if Iraq's request for American military aid will be granted, as insurgents gain momentum in the Middle East.

President Barack Obama is weighing a range of short-term military options, including airstrikes, to quell an al-Qaida inspired insurgency that has captured two Iraqi cities and threatened to press toward Baghdad.

For months now, Iraqi government officials have asked for help from the US to battle the rebels. The request for help from US troops has become more pressing as insurgents gain more territory.

It has been almost three years since troops were pulled out of the war in Iraq that began in 2003.

We spoke to a former marine who served in the war in Iraq and was injured in the line of duty. Dan Spangler suffered a hip injury. He says the thought of sending troops back to Iraq is alarming.

"It's a tough story for us all to swallow that we may be going back. We were there, we've done the job, we fixed the problem, and unfortunately, the country itself [Iraq] and then our country along with their government has slowly let it slip back to where it was," Spangler said. "I know several veterans who are very upset about this, including myself, we wasted our time it feels like."

We also spoke to a former US Diplomat in Iraq, Marshall Adame. He lived in Iraq for four years and saw up close how the war was affecting people in the Middle East. Adame says regardless of the decision made by the US, that as a country, Americans should not forget about the regular people in Iraq.

"The average Iraqi is a lot like the average American," Adame said. "They just want to work everyday earn their living, honestly, go home feed their families and enjoy the peace of a family life. Now the ones we hear from are the most dangerous ones,  but millions, the majority of them, are just people trying to make a living and try to live in peace."