CRAVEN COUNTY -

The wet and humid conditions are perfect for the Agaricus Bisporus, also know as the mushroom.  Ray Hayes of New Bern has a team of toad stools popping up every summer.  The view from his front porch shows the fungus among us.

"I guess it's a testimony to all the bad weather we've had, and the persistent rain we've had since June.  It's one of the wettest summers we've had and these are the things we've had to deal with," said Hayes.

Yards across Bear Town are peppered with mushrooms from the buttons to the large caps.  Ultraviolet rays turn them brown. That's what Hayes waits for.

"They burn off quickly when we have about a day of two of sunshine," said Hayes.

When the mushroom opens up, it reveals the gills.  Those hold the spores that can irritate your allergies.  The weather will have to dry out before the mushrooms can dry up.

TORI TIDBIT:  Some mushrooms grow in the formation of a circle also known as a fairy ring.  According to European folklore, the fairy ring is the location of gateways into elfin kingdoms, or places where elves gather and dance.  In the folklore, a fairy ring appears when a fairy, pixie or elf appears.  It will disappear without a trace in less than five days, but if an observer waits for the elf to return to the ring, he or she may be able to capture it.