No. 2: Weight loss/exercise

If you've struggled with health-related resolutions in the past, you're not alone -- not by a long shot.

According to an American Psychological Association poll conducted in March 2010, fewer than one in five adults reported being very successful with health-related resolutions such as losing weight, exercising regularly or eating a healthier diet.

One of the reasons so many fail is because of the all-or-none approach we all tend to take with resolutions. We feel great when we stick to a diet or exercising daily, but one slip has us considering our resolution "broken."

However, there's no reason a minor lapse should turn into a full-blown collapse. Instead, get right back on track. If you slip up, don't wait until next Jan. 1 to start again, but start right back up again the next day.

That same line of thinking is valuable in breaking any habit, but especially applies to our last broken resolution …

cigarettes in ash tray smoking

No. 1: Stop smoking

If you're a smoker looking to kick the habit in the new year, the numbers can be daunting.

It's said that the average smoker quits eight to 10 times before succeeding and -- as if that's not enough -- the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that the majority of quitters relapse within the first three months of quitting.

So, yeah, the deck is stacked, but don't light up just yet.

You're likely to fall off the wagon a few times along the way, so if you sneak a smoke after two weeks of abstaining, don't beat yourself up for your failure. Instead, celebrate those two weeks of progress and see if you can beat your new record.

As with any resolution you may make this year, just remember that if you fail, you're in good company as you get back on track.

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